Frequently Asked Questions

Do we need a permit to take down a tree?

Wish there were a simple answer. That depends on where you live and the size number and species of tree. Some do not require a permit while others may require a permit that is free or for a fee. Check the Tree Bylaws in the menu. For help you can contact me or your city/municipal office.

How to locate an International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) in your area?

Go to to the ©International Society of Arboriculture website here: http://www.isa-arbor.com/findanarborist/arboristsearch.aspx

Why is an ISA ceritfication important?

Many districts and municipalities such as the City of Victoria only recognize ISA qualified arborists to submit reports on tree health and safety.

What is a certified arborist?

An arborist, also called an arboriculturalist, is a person trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees, shrubs, vines, and other perennial woody plants. In a way it is like a surgeon for trees, my focus is not on harvesting but keeping your trees healthy. If possible I try to save your trees before having to take a tree down.

When is the best season to prune apple trees?

Most pruning is done when the tree is dormant, and the leaves are off.

Is there an easy way to tell if a dead tree could fall on my house?

If the tree is dead, it is safety first. Please call me to have it taken down unless I can find other alternatives.
To estimate how much of the tree could fall on your home, try this:

  1. Take a square piece of paper, e.g. cut 8.5×11 paper so it is 8×8.
  2. Fold the paper into a triangle. This makes a right triangle with one 90 and two 45 degree angles.
  3. Stand next to your home where you can see the tree.
  4. Hold the triangle so the 90 degree angle points toward the base of the tree and the bottom of the triangle is parallel (level) to the ground. Tilting the triangle so it is not level to the ground it will give inaccurate results.
  5. Now carefully look up the long part of the triangle (the hypotenuse). If any part of the tree is above your line of sight, that part of the tree could possibly land on your home.
    sight along triangle - tree above may fall on your house Warning: Many factors make this only a rough estimate, for example this does not make adjustments for: how high the triangle is above the ground, not keeping the triangle perfectly parallel to the ground, a tree leans at an angle, the base of the tree is higher or lower than your home, or the direction and speed storm winds that blows the tree down.